Major’s Place route 50

Not long after crossing the border from Utah into Nevada on route 50 about 15 minutes before Ely is a road-side place called Major’s Place. It’s a bar and grill with decent burgers and fries and nice company. It seems like a hole in the wall, but a lot of people have passed through from all over the country. You can sign a dollar bill and they’ll let you staple them to the wall. I saw dollars from Germany and Australia even. The bar tender and owner, Don, said Jason and I have brains in our heads. ” I get people bicycling from Maine and some even walk across country dragging carts that weigh a ton! They always seem to stop here.” He told us he was originally from Cincinnati, so we had a nice conversation about 5 way chili. He said, “Oh man! You guys had Skyline chili! I sure miss that chili!” Unfortunately, Don’s about about to sell his place to a guy sitting at the end of the bar. He said he didn’t like the cold winter.
IMG_1900.JPG

IMG_1899.JPG

Moab Utah

We decided to take a break from the highway and spend a day in Moab, Utah. I’ve never been to the desert, so the photographer in me wanted to click some off. J had recommended renting a Jeep and off-roading the Shafer Trail to the White Rim Trail to the Lathrop Canyon down to the Colorado River. We rented a Jeep until 6pm, so we decided to go as far as we could and turn back at the halfway point.
IMG_1861-0.JPG
The trails were described as intimidating to some but safe with the right vehicle for off-roading.

IMG_1852-0.JPG
They were dirt rocky roads with a dramatic drop off on one side. If I kept my eyes on the road my vertigo wouldn’t be tripped. But I couldn’t help looking with that view.

IMG_1863.JPG
Just as we were about to reach the Colorado River, we had to turn back. We would’ve run into a flash flood anyway, a big storm opened up and dumped a ton of rain on us.

IMG_1844.JPG

IMG_1848.JPG

IMG_1849.JPG
Now we had a muddy jeep to wash to avoid the fines, but we had a blast !

IMG_1865.JPG

We ran out of time to see Arches National Park. There’s so much to see and do, we really needed a week to get it all in. Now we have an excuse to return some day.

Autumn in The Rocky Mountains

I don’t really have much to say about the Rockies other than they are as beautiful as people say. I definitely recommend visiting in mid-late September when all the birch trees are turning yellow.IMG_1762.JPG
All the kids are back to school so the summer vacationers are gone and the ski season is a couple of months away. So lodging is slightly cheaper. We ended up staying a night at a hot spring resort to ease our weary bones. IMG_1744-2.JPG
I didn’t think I’d get altitude sickness, but both Jason and I woke up feeling hung over. I definitely felt as if I had just run a mile when all I did was walk up some stairs to get a few shots at The Continental Divide.

IMG_1715-0.JPG Now it’s onward to the Moab Desert, but with a lot of beautiful scenery along Route 50 to keep us company.

IMG_1756.JPG

Get Outa Dodge

Well, we avoided Dodge City all together. Mostly because it would dip us 3 hours further south of where we want to go in Colorado. So Jason suggested taking Route 24, which at first I complained because we’re supposed to be taking Route 50. But I quickly realized being rigid will induce boredom, and Truck Henge wasn’t far away in Topeka, Kansas. IMG_1656.JPG
So I thought we could check it out, take a few pictures, and head over to see The World’s Largest Ball of Twine.IMG_1657.JPG
Unfortunately I goofed and practically erased my photos, which I can recover later when we go home.
Fortunately I found this video that sums up our afternoon spent with Ron Lessman at Truck Henge (click here). I highly recommend stopping there if ever bored and passing through Kansas!!

St. Louis

We decided to make a pit stop in St. Louis and check out the Gateway Arch, which we could see from miles away upon approach.
IMG_1625.JPG
But first… lunch. Pappy’s Smokehouse fit the bill. Although, their deep fried corn on the cob may be an aquired taste.
IMG_1621.JPG

IMG_1620.JPG
We tried to check out The City Museum of St. Louis, but they were doing some work to the facade and it was closed.

IMG_1607.JPG
We got in anyway but were quickly, but politely turned away. It looks pretty interesting, and I think you can climb all over it inside and out. There were slides and climbing contraptions everywhere making the building look like a Mad Max set.

IMG_1622.JPG

IMG_1623.JPG
Next but not least, we had to go up in the Arch and take in the view. It’s 630 feet wide and 630 feet tall. Gulp… I get vertigo… as you can see in me clutching Jason as the James Bond-like pod clicked it’s way to the top.

IMG_1626.JPG
Once up there I was fine. The view of the Mississippi River was on one side and St. Louis on the other.

IMG_1628.JPG

IMG_1627.JPG

IMG_1611.JPG

IMG_1608.JPG

IMG_1610.JPG

Skyline Chili

And off we go, south to Cincinnati to pick up Route 50 West. A friend told us to try the Skyline chili while there. I discovered it had become a chain and the original diner was no longer there. However, Skyline chili has become a type of Greek chili served on top of spaghetti or a hot dog. This is 5 way: spaghetti, chili, onion, beans, and cheese…
IMG_1583.JPG
We decided to stop at Camp Washington Chili instead, which serves the 5 way Greek chili Cincinnati is known for. It hit the spot. It’s not as spicy as southern chili and has a hint of cinnamon. Speaking of southern, I had no idea Cincinnatians had southern accents. As we were having a seat at the bar where we could watch them make the chili concoctions, a burly waitress hollered back at the kitchen, “Watcha hangin round fer Andy? Is Crystal on break, or are ya waitin’ fer potentials ta show up?”
“Yep ‘n yep”
“Seems like some ‘o dem don’t need a job!”
“I feel the same way!”, another haggard waitress complained. 5 seconds later a teenaged girl ran through the door to clock in while the kitchen staff clucked and rolled their eyes. I scarfed down my 5 way while checking the map to see where to pick up Route 50.
IMG_1587.JPG

Home Town

We decided to check in on parents in our home town, Toledo Ohio, before heading West. My parents are doing alright all things considered.
IMG_1573.JPG
My sisters and I “helped” move our parents into assisted living after discovering my father’s struggles in dealing with my mom’s dementia. She has Pick’s disease, which hits earlier in life than Alzheimer’s does, but is almost identical in symptoms. Every now and then I’ll check in on them. They seemed happy to have visitors.

IMG_1571.JPG
Jason’s mom is alive and well.

IMG_1578-1.JPG
We decided to check out the new National Great Lakes Museum, which covers a lot of the maritime history of the Great Lakes. It’s a pretty interesting exhibit and recommend going if you’re ever in Toledo.

IMG_1577.JPG

Road Trip: Brooklyn to San Francisco

When our friend, J Braun, asked if we would like to drive his Miata across country to San Francisco, we said we would have to see if we could afford the trip… and then said yes anyway. We took a look at it, and drove it up to Maine to see if we could handle being in a small convertable, together, for that long of a trip. We decided to do it because the car is small, sporty, and fun. And neither Jason nor I had driven across country.

miata

 

It was suggested to us to take Route 50 across the middle of the country. Route 50, also known as The Loneliest Highway, is one of the last transcontinental highways that hasn’t been chopped up over the years.

draft_lens17572437module147804225photo_1302986514Loneliest_Road_in_America
We’re looking forward to taking in some history and taking plenty of photos. Until we get going, I can share some photos from our last visit to the California. Like this trip, our first stop is our home town Toledo, Oh to say hello to the folks before starting out on our trip.

toledo
toledo2
Last time we skipped the middle and flew straight to San Francicso. I have a few photos from that trip burning a hole in my hard drive that I haven’t processed yet. Some were of Sonoma…

senoma
And quite a few of Yosemite, which we will meet up with J there this trip. He has a family-friend he grew up with who has an A frame cabin inside of Yosemite. There is a residential area inside the park that had been there for decades. It is now against the law to build inside of the park, but these cabins were grandfathered in.
halfdomeA
There was a recent forest fire the last time we stayed in Yosemite near the cabin. I was told they suspected the fire was set on purpose to get rid of the cabins so the park to take back their land… but who knows.  I’m curious to see what has or hasn’t grown back.
fire

And our last stop will be in San Francisco to drop off the car to J’s dad and then fly home. J said next year, he and his wife, Beth, may drive the car back home to where they live in Connecticut.

sanfran1

J is actually going to take a trip that will make our’s look like child’s play, which is why he’s in Yosemite when we’re driving through. He’s picking up a Honda Africa Twin (yes, it’s a dual sport motorcycle) to ride down to Mexico and then meander back home on as many dirt roads as he can find. He has his own blog going where he’s posting about the trip. Check him out on Monday Moto Madness

IMG_4323

 

 

 

The Unfauxhemian Reincarnated

It’s been a while since my last blog entry, mainly because I lost interest. I don’t really want to record every boring detail of day to day life for all to yawn over, so I let the Unfauxhemian die a few years ago.  However, I have been doing more than sit on the couch and stalk Facebook friends these days. Since my last entry, I got a motorcycle and my license, I’ve moved several times (within Brooklyn), I joined an all-female motorcycle group (which is loaded with stories)… So I thought I’d bring The Unfauxhemian back to life for the purpose of tracking a road trip Jason and I are about to take across country. We’ll see where it goes from there. Besides, this takes a little more thought than Facebooking, and I don’t have to worry about giving up my soul to social media while sharing a few photos and some short stories.